Six Dive Watches You Need

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If you’re a horologist like me there’s definitely one type of watch you will always want to add to your collection, and that’s a diving watch. In the past they have typical been tailored to, well divers however, as we progress forward into this century you’ll see around you the typical markings of a dive watch everywhere; big bezel minute markers, a vivid luminescent lume, and of course waterproofing to deep depths. All of which are a prerequisite of a dive watch as stated by ISO 6425 standard.

Yet despite the fact many of us watch lovers will forever be condemned to ‘work desk diving’, having a reputable dive watch in the collection is a must. This leaves us all with a stressful problem  – which one to go for? A decision that’s not to be taken lightly as said watch may stay with us throughout ours, our children’s, and maybe even their children’s life time (if not sold for a likely profit later on).

To help ease the stress and add years to your life the team at The Cixx have rounded up our top picks. A selection containing not just the most commercial brands, but a few wildcards that will get your thumbs twitching.

So here they are – Six Dive Watches You Need.

1. Rolex Submariner

Let’s be honest… this was always going to be first on the list.

Here we have the infamous Rolex Submariner, a timepiece that will not only have heads turning, but a signature watch that has carved its way, and will forever be ingrained in the history books. The classic class leading design forged from hard Oystersteel has a welcoming look – no thanks to the liquid noir ceramic uni-directional bezel and dial.

Diameter: 40mm, Water-resistance: 300m, Movement: Automatic, Case Material: Oystersteel, Reference: 116610LN

Pros: High Quality, Classic look.

Cons: Expensive, Ubiquitous.

Price as of date article posted: £6250.00     Link to product

2. Tudor Pelagos

Siblings are always found close by.

It’s hard to overlook Tudor as a company, after all their big brother, Rolex, is a very sort after brand. Although often pitched as a cheaper Rolex, Tudors offers are far from low quality. The Pelagos is a robust dive watch with all the finishes, bells and whistles you would expect only from the industry greats.

Diameter: 42mm, Water-resistance: 500m, Movement: Automatic, Case Material: Titanium, Reference: M25600TN-0001

Pros: Unique look, High Quality, Good value for money, Left hand option available.

Cons: Large at 42mm.

Price as of date article posted: £3622.00     Link to product

Ball Engineer Master II Diver DM1020A

3. Ball Engineer Master Dive II

Radioactivity with some coolness.

You may not have heard of the company branded Ball, but many of Ball’s offers have unique features which set them apart. Yes, you guessed it, the Ball Engineer Master Dive II with its self-powered micro gas lights containing radioactive tritium (H3) in one of them. That feature plus the 5000G shock resistance, and has an anti-magnetic rating of 4,800A/m meant The Cixx could not ignore this watch.

Diameter: 40mm, Water-resistance: 300m, Movement: Automatic, Case Material: Stainless Steel, Reference: DM1020A

Pros: Unique look, Unique story (watch houses radioactive tritium gas), High Quality, Good value for money, Relatively cheap.

Cons: Unique look might not be to everyone’s taste.

Price as of date article posted: £1555.00     Link to product

4. Seiko

Keep your pockets heavy with cash, and dive deep with the big timers.

Mistakenly known for cheaper watches, Seiko, the watch-maker Bohemoth also makes high quality watches. Here the Seiko SNZF17K1 dubbed ‘sea urchin’ is an example of that. Glance too quickly at the black ceramic bezel and black dial, and you’ll be forgiven for thinking this was the Submariner. Not to mention the Seiko can be customized heavily – a common modification is to swap of the hands to match that of Rolex’s.

Release Date: 2009,  Diameter: 42mm, Water-resistance: 100m, Movement: Automatic, Case Material: Stainless Steel, Reference: SNZF17K1

Pros:Classic look, Extremely affordable, High quality, Customizable.

Cons: None.

Price as of date article posted: £165.60     Link to product

5. G-Shock

Tick tock the G-Shock won’t stop.

Quartz? G-Shock? I hear you say. Phrases that send shivers up many spine’s, but despite what ‘watch experts’ will tell you, the GA-100 belongs on this list. The robust and rugged wristwatch we would expect from G-Shock will not let you down. The GA-100 boasts multifuctional capabilities so you never have to worry if you have the right tool for the job… just don’t wear this beast with a suit.

Release Date: 2010,  Diameter: 52mm, Water-resistance: 200m, Movement: Quartz, Case Material: Resin, Reference: GA-100-1A1ER

Pros: Rugged look, Reliable, Extremely affordable, Multifunctional.

Cons: Bulky, Quartz seen as inferior.

Price as of date article posted: £63.00     Link to product

5. Bell & Ross

When being square is hip.

Imagine the perfect watch…you’ll find that 90% people’s visual ruminations will match quite closely. Bell & Ross have been able to think outside the box to garnish their watch with a design not within this 90% which they take pride in. Here the Bell & Ross BR03-92 is combination of such thinking; uniqueness and diving functionality.

Release Date: 2010,  Diameter: 42mm, Water-resistance: 300m, Movement: Automatic, Case Material: Stainless Steel, Reference: BR03-92

Pros: Quirky design, Compact for 42mm.

Cons: None 

Price as of date article posted: £2335.00     Link to product

Which one would I purchase? Well, with all that being said my pick would be the Tudor Pelagos. The combination of low cost and high quality finish is too much to resist, in fact it’s making me want to purchase one now.

 

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